PAULY TON POPFILTER

  • Language German
  • Language English

Pauly.SuperScreen - The popfilter that leaves the voice natural

The Designer Hilmar Pauly

Hilmar Pauly Hilmar Pauly in his Karmann Ghia
He is an old hand. Nothing in life could bring him down, he held his course through the times, and he seems to defy old age successfully. A schoolboy at heart, a Gyro Gearloose in his head – that’s Hilmar Pauly, electrician, audio engineer, and innovator. In fact, he invented the best pop filter of all times. He doesn’t produce his “SuperScreen”, as he fondly calls it, just with the help of suppliers. No, on top of that he personally manufactures all the machinery necessary for production. Even the machine for gluing the cute labels on the cartons. Everything is handmade – all parts made in Germany. On that, you can depend.

As a sound engineer in his own studio, which contains gorgeous vintage equipment next to the digital racks, Hilmar Pauly sometimes reflects on the good old times of analog recording and the warm dynamics of yesterdays: “Neumann U 47 – what a marvelous microphone that was, right from the German “Wirtschaftswunder”. He’s still using two of those today, and often says: “Radio technology of the sixties sounded so warm, so sincere. Alas, it did carry a bit of noise. But that’s water under the bridge.”
Meanwhile, with his extensive experience as a sound engineer and mechanic, Hilmar Pauly produces the now legendary Pauly pop filter. A high-tech-device that uniquely eliminates pop and other air-flow-caused noise of the human voice before it can hit the microphone cartridge. Word has long gotten around to the U.S.A. Even Paul McCartney experienced the advantages of the Pauly pop filter (see Illustration at “V.I.P. voices”), and so the Pauly-SuperScreen conquered the American market and became appreciated by major microphone manufacturers.

Digital or analog – the Pauly.SuperScreen does not care. It always does its job most effectively, without frequency loss, without the voice sounding lifeless but quite natural.

As natural as the connection between his 1965 Volks­wagen convertible, Hilmar Pauly and the historic gas station in the background of the photograph, when gas cost $ 0,51 a gallon like it says on the pump, which was not adjusted since 1966.

Hilmar Pauly is a true master of his trade, the designer and engineer of the Pauly-SuperScreen. The pop filter that leaves the voice natural.